Broome Campus Unit Information: Aboriginal Studies

AB100 Aboriginal People
Note: This unit is prerequisite for enrolling in further Aboriginal Studies Units at UNDA
Aboriginal People aims to promote, from a largely historical perspective, an understanding of the relationships of indigenous peoples with other members of the Western Australian community. It therefore focuses on patterns of positive interaction, conflict and alienation between settler and Aboriginal communities. The unit will provide you with the opportunity to explore Aboriginal and non Aboriginal perspectives on government policies from 1827 to the present; focusing on issues of Aboriginality, power and control. It will also link a number of contemporary West Australian issues to this history. The reading, writing and wider observations developed within this unit is consistently directed towards a critical understanding of the interaction between indigenous and mainstream Australian values and activities in historical and contemporary contexts.

AB110 Foundation to Australian Indigenous Languages
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
This unit introduces students to indigenous languages of Australia, particularly in Western Australia, and provides a foundation for further studies in these languages and in descriptive linguistics. Three main topics will be covered. Firstly Australian languages will be viewed in the context of world languages. Secondly the sounds of Australian languages, and how to write these oral languages, will be explored along with linguistic, social and educational issues. Examples will be mainly drawn from the Kimberley through the students’ own languages and will be included where possible. Preservation of languages will be the third topic, looking at the role Aboriginal people, schools, and other agents, play in the maintenance of Australian indigenous languages.

AB202 Cultural and Spiritual Life of Aboriginal People
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
The first part of the unit looks at Aboriginal society and culture in its more traditional forms and what social organisation is understood to be like prior to the European invasion of Australia. The following topics will be studied: the social organisation and structure of traditional Aboriginal society eg. basic social groups, kinship and marriage customs; the relationship with the land; the life-style and various initiations associated with it; religious belief and practices, for example, The Dreaming, how Aboriginal people are connected to country, rituals, healing and sorcery. In the second part of the unit Students will develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of culture and appreciate that Aboriginal culture is not static. Contemporary issues studied such as the recognition of customary law, land rights and Aboriginal heritage protection show students the cultural continuities that connect the traditional past with the present.

AB300 Action Research Project
Note: Prerequisite Completion of an Aboriginal Studies Major and RM 100 Research Methods
This unit provides undergraduate students specialising in Aboriginal Studies with an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they have obtained from an Aboriginal Studies Major and RM100 Research Methods by combining three elective units (9 credit points total) within a single practical (Action Research) environment. It is an individual student directed research unit linked to ongoing supervision by the Coordinator of Aboriginal Studies Broome Campus. In addition to working closely with their supervisor students will be located within an appropriate working environment that provides practical experience and the opportunity to engage in a relatively small scale action research project. The topic, content and methodology of the project to be negotiated with the host organisation(s), the student and the Coordinator. Issues such as Ethics Clearances etc to be handled in association with the UNDA Research Committee and the relevant host organisations.

AB302 Aboriginal Women and Society
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
AB302 offers students the opportunity to focus on women’s issues in relation to Aboriginal studies. Students will study the stereotyping of Aboriginal women during colonial expansion through the accounts of the early non Aboriginal commentators and assess the degree these stereotypes have persisted today. Students will also see how Eurocentrism and male chauvinism have affected the position of Aboriginal women in non Aboriginal society today. Contemporary issues such as land rights and the recognition of Aboriginal sites will studied from a feminist perspective to show the all too often neglected position of Aboriginal women on these issues.

AB303 Aboriginal People in Contemporary Australian Society
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
This unit has been developed for students whose future careers require an in depth understanding of the complex, multi layered field of contemporary inter cultural relationships. In particular it aims to develop in students an appreciation of this relationship within the socio-political context of conflicting values and beliefs, government policies and service delivery. To achieve this objective the unit commences with an examination of the nature and diversity of Aboriginal knowledge and experience as an introduction to the fundamental issues underlying contemporary debate over land, native title and regional agreements. The basic interconnections between Federalism, Bureaucracy and Service Delivery are then analysed at the macro level, through an examination of our current political/funding structures, before utilising case studies as a means of developing an understanding of what is happening 'on the ground'. The issues of relationships of power, community governance and the employment of non Aboriginal expertise within the Aboriginal domain are dealt with in the context of local studies situated within WA. The final module then focuses on Welfare Dependency, Symptom or Cause, as the major issue currently under the socio-political spotlight.

AB304 Aboriginal People and the Media
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
This unit has as its goal is to develop an appreciation of how issues, currently the focus of intense scrutiny and debate located within the discourse of Aboriginal Australia, are represented in the media. To achieve this aim the unit commences with a study of the historical role played by the media in shaping colonial attitudes towards indigenous Australians before moving on to examine the nature and depth of current television and newspaper coverage of Aboriginal affairs. The unit then explores theories and practices relating to the nature of the media before concluding with an examination of recent Aboriginal media initiatives in both the print and electronic mediums.

AB 310 Indigenous Australian Languages
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
Also note that this unit is not available to students who have completed AB110
This unit provides students with an opportunity to study indigenous languages of Australia and in particular, Western Australia. Three main topics will be covered. Firstly Australian languages will be viewed in the context of world languages. Secondly the sounds of Australian languages, and how to write these oral languages, will be explored along with linguistic, social and educational issues. Examples will be mainly drawn from the Kimberley through the students’ own languages and will be included where possible. Preservation of languages will be the third topic, looking at the role Aboriginal people, schools, and other agents, play in the maintenance of Australian indigenous languages.

AB325 Special Projects
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
This unit provides students with an opportunity to undertake an individual directed study as an elective within a Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies major). It is therefore based on a negotiated field of study that primarily utilises secondary source material. For example, an extensive literature review of publications and other forms of critical commentary on contemporary Aboriginal Art, Aboriginal involvement in the tourist industry, etc. The unit is designed to explore, in depth, one of the many issues raised within the broader context of units undertaken earlier in the B. Arts degree in order seek further specific knowledge and skills to satisfy particular interests and/or enhance employment prospects.

AB333/433 Aboriginal People and Social Justice
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
Aboriginal People and Social Justice offers students an opportunity to study the problematic relationship that exists between Indigenous and non Indigenous Australians within the context of the changing, multi-layered and often problematic notion of social justice. To achieve this objective the course develops a number of inter-related themes whose common thread is the role of reconciliation in maintaining and further developing the nation's sense of well being and worth as a liberal, constitutional democracy.

AB 335 Studies in Australian Indigenous Languages
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
Also note that this unit is not available to students who have completed AB110
This unit examines the location and principle features of indigenous languages of Australia and in doing so provides a foundation for further studies in descriptive linguistics. Three main topics will be covered. Firstly Australian languages will be viewed in the context of world languages. Secondly the sounds of Australian languages, and how to write these languages, will be explored along with linguistic, social and educational issues. Examples will be mainly drawn from the Kimberley Region. Preservation of languages will be the third topic, looking at the role Aboriginal people, schools, and other agents, play in the maintenance of Australian indigenous languages.

AB372 History of Aboriginal People in the Kimberley Region
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
This aim of this unit is to develop a critical understanding of the interaction between Indigenous and mainstream Australian values, government policies, their administration and the imperatives of socio-economic development within a regional context. To assist in achieving these objectives the introductory topic examines the vexed question 'who writes history' or, put another way, 'whose histories do we listen to.' With this question firmly planted in the back of our minds the focus then shifts to a relatively brief examination of the diversity of social structures and resource management regimes developed by pre colonial society in the Kimberley. The following topics then pick up on the consequences of non indigenous contact through an examination of the relationships that developed between colonised and coloniser over a period of approximately one hundred years. The attitudes and responses of diverse groups such as non indigenous explorers, pastoralists, pearlers, missionaries, government officials and others to an indigenous presence will be included in these topics. Conversely the attitudes and responses of the indigenous peoples will also be examined. The concluding topics will then provide an overview of what is often referred to as the post-colonial period commencing with the initial implementation of the policy of self- determination in 1972 through to the 1980's. Events covered by these topics include the growth and incorporation of Aboriginal communities/organisations and Land Rights issues as well as an exploration of the role played by significant Aboriginal figures in the post war development of the region.

AB399 Aboriginal Historiography
Prerequisites AB100 & RM100
This unit provides students with an opportunity to undertake an individual directed study as an elective within a Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies major). The unit is therefore designed to meet a demand from students who, having completed a major in this area, seek further specific knowledge and skills to satisfy particular interests within the field of Aboriginal Historiography

ED4750 History of Aboriginal Education
Note: Prerequisite AB100 Aboriginal People
This unit offers teachers an opportunity to develop an appreciation of historical events as an essential element in their understanding of contemporary issues relating to the education of indigenous Australians and, as educators, their active involvement in the reconciliation process. For students other than teachers the unit offers an opportunity to extend their knowledge and experience of Aboriginal Studies and the nature of history within a context that encourages a deeper understanding of their part in the process of reconciliation. The introductory topic deals with the increasingly vexatious issue of what is Aboriginal History and who should write it followed by an examination of the link between shifting ideologies, policies and the provision of Aboriginal education from the early 19th to the late 20th century. The focus then moves to a detailed examination, utilising case studies, of the role of Missions as major providers of education for much of the period under review. The concluding topic will then provide an overview of post-war Aboriginal education leading up to, but not including, the implementation of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy.